Easy Steps to Create Bokeh in Night Photography

Easy Steps to Create Bokeh in Night Photography

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Easy Steps to Create Bokeh in Night Photography

If you feel like your portrait photography is musty, a night portrait is an impressive way to spark things up. Forming beautiful circles of light in the background of a night portrait is not complex, but it will need a little understanding of the depth arena. Before starting how to create bokeh, understand carefully what is bokeh? It is defined as the soft-out-of-focus backdrop effect that you get when shooting a subject.

To attain bokeh in an image, you require to use a sharper lens – the faster the better. This enchanting effect is a classic example of what bokeh photography can help you achieve. Bokeh is a very robust shot that photographers use to make an atmosphere of fantasy, magical view, or even mysticism, all of which add a story to your image. Not only that, but bokeh also forms splendid backgrounds. Using the Bokeh effect for nighttime.

An easy step for creating a beautiful bokeh effect in night photography

Step 1: Find a light source

The real definition of bokeh is not just the blurred backdrop, but the blurred light. Naturally, this means that you have to find a light source. The best light sources for making bokeh are small. For example; the sun itself will not make a bokeh effect, but there will be small patches of sunlight coming through the leaves that will do perfectly for you.  Or, you can also use lights coming from the windows of buildings. Separate from determining small light sources, keep in mind that the colour of the light source will also appear in your pictures.

Easy Steps to Create Bokeh in Night Photography

Step 2: Use the right lens

The reason some people are dissatisfied with Bokeh is that they are perhaps using the wrong lens. The clandestine to getting the attractive bokeh is using a correct lens, whose aperture is at least f / 2.8, with a fast aperture of f / 2, f / 1.8, or f / 1.4 being idyllic. Numerous photographers like to use photo prime lenses, shooting photos when they want a bokeh effect. Apart from this, you can also use telephoto lenses to create blurred backdrops. Lenses with longer focal length increase the depth of the lens over long distances, even if the distance between the camera and the subject is not changed.

night photography

When picking the ideal Bokeh lens, consider looking at the aperture blade as well. For instance, a lens with 9 blades makes a rounder aperture, making the light sources look spherical and more natural. Alternatively, a lens that has fewer blades (around 5 or 7) makes polygon-shaped that seem less desirable.

Step 3: Position your subject away from the light source

Photographers often place their subject directly in front of the background or even lean against it. But, the farther away your subject is from the background, get a better-blurred background. In order to make a good bokeh, the background needs to be blurred, so ensure the position of your subject at least a few feet ahead of the light source. If you want smaller circles, keep even more distance between subject and background. This allows various components of the photo to be blurred.

Step 4: Set your camera to AV mode

Your primary concern in acquiring Bokeh is to keep your aperture wide, then it is practical to set your camera to AV mode (also acknowledged as aperture priority). This beneficial setting lets you select the aperture and automatically set the shutter speed for you. A fast lens helps click the perfect bokeh.50mm f.1 / 8, f / 1.4 or f / 2.8 may be the best lens options to get the bokeh effect.

Further, in AV mode, you will not have to set your exposure and loss precious time bungling with the button. Once your aperture is set, all you have to do press the shutter. However, in difficult lighting conditions, your camera may not always get the exposure true. Sometimes, your camera gets jumbled and takes the off-beam exposure setting, so use your exposure compensation button to adjust how light (dark and light).

Step 5: Pick a nice background

It is necessary to find a good background for your photos.  Without the right background, it is easy to blur a part of the scene with your lens, not certainly guaranteeing a good bokeh to your photo. For example; Plain background does not create good bokeh because there is nothing much going on visually. Therefore, you need to thoroughly explore the location before finding the true place from where you can get stunning bokeh.

One of the best locations would be a place that offers a clear view. The perfect locations for Bokeh are in urban locations; city lights, street lights, or traffic lights.  On the other side, if you are in rural areas, look for a pond or lake, as the reflected light on the bodies of water also creates a breath-taking bokeh effect. You can get a vibrant pattern or soft textures and patterns in the image. 

Step 6:  Consider a good foreground too

People usually visualize a picture with a blurred background when they think of bokeh. But the term also spread in the foreground.  Apart from selecting a good background, you also have to choose a stunning foreground.  Like the background, look for attractive lights and patterns to fill the foreground as well.  When working with a broad aperture, shallow depth of field is applied for equally background and foreground.  Once you focus on your subject in the middle, everything back and forth becomes blurred.

For excellent foreground bokeh, find some insightful surfaces such as windows. The light reflected on the windows simply fills the negative space in front of your subject. You can experiment with different angles while doing this technique. Photographers use string lights to achieve foreground bokeh.

Step 7: Use a longer focal length where possible

Using a longer focal length benefits you make larger Bokeh circles. If you are using a zoom lens, try to capture the photo at the telephoto end. Focal lengths of 105mm and 50mm, even when shot with the same F-number, there is a lot of difference in the size of the Bokeh circle. The longer the focal length, the less visual you can capture due to narrow angles.

Choose the focal length that best suits your subject. Use at least 70 mm on a full-frame camera or at least 50 mm on an APS-C camera outcome in a moderately large bokeh circle. Give it a try. If this is not what you want, you can adjust accordingly.

Step 8: Move closer to your subject

To create beautiful bokeh shots, make sure you focus on the subject.If you focus too much on getting that bokeh in the back, you can forget that your primary focus should be the subject.  In addition to this, you also need to check if the light behind your subject is too vibrant. Otherwise, your subject will end up backlit.  Hence, to make an upright exposure, focus more on your subject and not what is behind. In short, simply focus on your subject to be lit up.

Wrapping up

Congratulations, you now know the golden rules of creating the Bokeh effect in night photography! Now that you know how, be creative with the fallout. Discover the location of string lights and making bokeh with city lights, street lamps, or daylight. The key to capturing an impressive bokeh effect is to find a light source, position your subject several feet away from the light source, and use a wide aperture and focus on the subject.

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